HFCS vs Sugar | Natural Health Podcast

What Sugar is Really Healthy?

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) says we’re using less high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). However, the problem is that while high fructose corn syrup consumption is down, overall sugar consumption grew to about 140 pounds per person per year in the U.S., a 20% jump since 1970.  Understand what sugars are healthy to eat in this health podcast.

You’d think it would be reason to jump for joy when the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), which tracks how much we eat of the various sweeteners on the market, says we’re using less high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). According to the USDA’s most recent report, consumption of HFCS in the U.S. has declined by 11 percent. As a result, HFCS manufacturers will buy 13 percent less corn this year, compared to 2001. However, the problem is that while high fructose corn syrup consumption is down, overall sugar consumption isn’t. In fact, the consumption of sugar and added sweeteners in our food grew to about 140 pounds per person per year in the U.S., a 20% jump since 1970. Yes it’s true that during the same timeframe, the balance tipped strongly in the direction of HFCS, which reached a high of about 64 pounds per person in 1999, an increase of about 66 percent over 1970 consumption levels. But once HFCS started getting some bad press, sugar marketing organizations fought back via advertising, notably the Sugar Association’s “Sweet by Nature” campaign. And now consumers can have the satisfaction of having started a return to that “natural” and “healthy” ingredient, refined sugar. But this isn’t a better choice; it’s Morton’s Fork — two lines of reasoning that lead to the same unpleasant conclusion. Understand what sugars are healthy to eat, do not contribute to obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure, and why stevia may not be that much more healthier with this health podcast.

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