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Q and A with Jon Barron

q&a with jon barron

We receive thousands of questions every month at The Baseline of Health® Foundation, not to mention the numerous questions received by Baseline Nutritionals.

We receive thousands of questions every month at The Baseline of Health® Foundation, not to mention the numerous questions received by Baseline Nutritionals®, with whom I’m also associated. Those that can be handled by the Foundation staff and the Baseline Nutritionals customer support team are forwarded to me! Some of those questions open the door to broader issues related to health and nutrition.  I’ve selected some of those questions to share with you today. (Note: these questions come from both the Baseline of Health Foundation and Baseline Nutritionals. Normally, I keep these two sites separate and only rarely mention a Baseline Nutritionals’ product by name on the Foundation website. This, however, is one of those occasions where it makes sense to do so because many of the questions that come to me are product/ingredient specific. With that said, let’s take a look at some of the Q and A.)

Ebola

Question:

About a month ago, you sent out a newsletter observing that most of the news about Ebola amounted to “fear mongering” and that you thought we shouldn’t be that worried about it, that it wasn’t a threat. With all the recent news about how it’s spreading through Africa, that the World Health Organization declared it an epidemic, and we keep hearing about people flying into different countries carrying Ebola with them, are you still as confident that we have nothing to worry about?

Answer:

Perhaps you misunderstood. What I said was:

“Make no mistake, this outbreak is a threat–but more so for people in Africa than for anyone in the developed world.”

I also pointed out that there are three main differences between Africa and the developed world which limited the possibility of a notable Ebola outbreak outside of Africa.

  • ebola symptoms chartThe developed world has better training for dealing with highly infectious diseases.
  • The developed world has superior healthcare infrastructure and technology. It may not be fair, but it’s true.
  • Then I talked about culture. The eating of bush meat is much less common in the developed world, and contact with body fluid from contaminated animals is required for Ebola to keep spreading. This is so key to the perpetuation of Ebola that researchers have mapped out the areas where human contact with infected animals is likely to occur. They are almost entirely in Central and West Africa–not Europe, America, or Asia.1 Kate Kelland. “Ebola map shows people in more African regions risk infection from animals,” Reuters Kate Kelland. (Accessed 8 Sept 2014.) http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/09/08/us-health-ebola-map-idUSKBN0H314G20140908 . And, perhaps even more important, despite the low levels of satisfaction with most of the governments in the US, Europe, and the BRIC countries (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), it is unlikely that you will ever see in those countries what you saw in Liberia where the people were so distrustful of the government and so disbelieving of the reality of the disease that they looted an Ebola clinic, “set free” the patients, and stole all of the infected bedding.[fn] “Ebola Clinic Is Looted In Liberian Capital’s Largest Slum.” The World Post. 08172014. (Accessed 7 Sept 2014.) http:www.huffingtonpost.com2014

References   [ + ]

1. Kate Kelland. “Ebola map shows people in more African regions risk infection from animals,” Reuters Kate Kelland. (Accessed 8 Sept 2014.) http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/09/08/us-health-ebola-map-idUSKBN0H314G20140908

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